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We believe God as Creator, the resurrected Christ, and the Holy Spirit, who guides the creative and redemptive work of God in the world. We practice Biblical scholarship to let scripture lead us to deeper and relevant understandings of how to be faithful seekers and disciples. God is still speaking.
 
Faith Formation is Sundays at 9:15 am
Sunday Worship is at 10:25 am
Bible Studies Learn More Click Here
 
Our services are designed to engage us in a deeper experience of God, communion with each other and active love/justice-making in the world.  The style of worship  may be traditional or more interactive. Our Blessing of the Animals service is usually outside, Communion breakfast in our downstairs Fellowship Hall, most services in our stained glass sanctuary. All are ways of listening for God’s message.
 
Come as you are. Come with your questions and convictions. Come with your celebrations and concerns. Connect with us via the website opportunities (sermons, music and posts) and/or join with us in our social justice missions. Learn with us in our Bible Studies and be in community with us.
 
 We often celebrate the spiritual season in accordance with the wider www.ucc.org community as per the following liturgical calendar.
 
Advent is a season of spiritual preparation for the celebration of the birth of Christ (Christmas).
 
Christmas and Christmas Season
The Lectionary readings for Christmas and the following twelve days (culminating in the feast of the Epiphany) invite the church to reflect on the Incarnation (or embodiment) of God as a human being: “The Word became a human being and lived among us, and we have seen his glory….” (John 1:14). In Christ, God enters human history and identifies fully with the human condition.
 
Lent
Over the years, Lent became a season of preparation for the church. Self-examination, study, fasting, prayer and works of love are disciplines historically associated with Lent. Conversion—literally, the “turning around” or reorientation of our lives towards God—is the theme of Lent. Both as individuals and as a community, we look inward and reflect on our readiness to follow Jesus.
 

On Ash Wednesday, ashes are placed on the foreheads of the congregation as a symbol that we have come from dust and one day will return to dust. It is one of many customs that remind us of our connection with Jewish tradition. With this sobering reminder of life’s fragility, we begin a spiritual quest that continues until Easter.

During Holy Week, the congregation follows the footsteps of Jesus from his entry into Jerusalem (Palm/Passion Sunday) through the Last Supper (Maundy Thursday) to his death on the Cross (Good Friday). 
 
Easter and Pentecost
Easter is the highest holy day for Christians. It is a time of celebrating God’s love and Life are more powerful than death. In three of the gospels, those first to the tomb are surprised by an empty tomb and are invited to go tell the other disciples the Christ is alive!  Fifty days  after Easter, Christians celebrate Pentecost, following the Jewish tradition of fifty days between Passover and Shavuot—the feast celebrating the giving of the Torah to Moses.
 

Season after Pentecost
This longest season of the liturgical year is often called  “Ordinary Time.” In this time, we explore the mission of the church, the life and teachings of Jesus, and the Jewish scripture which was foundational for Jesus.

104 E Main St, Hummelstown, PA 17036 | (717) 566-8893 | hucc@hummelstownucc.org